We Are Not Alone

We Are Not Alone

A family moves into an old house, where strange occurrences become increasingly disturbing. They enlist the help of a local priest (who makes it very clear that he is not, in fact, an exorcist), and unfortunate events ensue.

This a good enough haunted house/exorcism movie if you approach it on its own terms. It’s short (an hour and fifteen minutes), and there’s no fat at all in the storytelling: it gets right to the point and doesn’t spend any time on subplots or a lot of characterization. There are some genuinely creepy moments, especially in the hidden basement, and the haunting stays within the rules it establishes at the start. I kind of expected a little more–I’ve had good luck lately with Spanish-language horror–but this is a serviceable scary movie. (And I liked the call out to “The Changeling” with the ghostly ball.)

Two important takeaways: if you discover a secret basement in your house at 3 AM, you should probably wait until later in the day to explore it; and if the priest you’ve engaged to battle a demonic force in your house explicitly states that he’s not an exorcist, maybe ask around before committing. (Every Catholic diocese is required to have an exorcist on staff; when I had an internship at a diocesan office in college, I used to have coffee breaks with our exorcist, though I’m not sure he would actually have been a lot more effective in this case than poor Father Rafael.)